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Wakenight & Associates, P.C.

707 N. York Street, Suite 201, Elmhurst, IL 60126

DuPage County | 630-852-9700

Mokena | 815-727-6144   Oak Park | 708-848-3159

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Hinsdale family law attorney joint simplified dissolution

The most common type of divorce in Illinois is the typical, formal dissolution of marriage. This can be completed in various ways, including through the use of mediation, collaborative law, or litigation. All of these procedures can be used to reach the same end result, though how a couple gets there can vary wildly from case to case. In some cases, divorce can take months or even years, and spouses may wish to avoid a long, drawn-out process and do everything they can to complete the process quickly and effectively. One option that is available to a select group of married individuals in Illinois is called the Joint Simplified Dissolution. A simplified dissolution allows couples to keep costs down and spend much less time finalizing the divorce. However, this option is not available to everyone.

Important Considerations Before You Start

Before you can decide to get a joint simplified dissolution, you must first understand that it only applies to specific types of cases. There are limits on how long you were married, how much property you own, and you and your spouse’s income. Additionally, there are a few key things to keep in mind if you are considering a joint simplified dissolution:

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Oak Brook marital property division attorney

Most of the decisions you make during your divorce can and probably will affect you for the rest of your life, but one of the most important decisions you and your spouse must come to is how you will divide your marital estate. For many couples, this can be an emotional and highly contentious process because of the importance placed on their belongings and the need to have financial security after the divorce process has been completed. The way marital property is divided can affect a person’s financial stability or even their ability to retire later in life. With so much at stake, Illinois courts urge couples to try to come to an agreement on their own about property division, though, if they cannot, they will have to take the issue to court.

Factors for Consideration

If a couple is unable to reach an agreement about how their marital estate will be divided, they will have to appear before a judge so that he or she can make a determination for them. If this happens, the judge will only make decisions about marital property, or any property that was acquired after the couple was legally married but before a judgment of legal separation was entered. The judge will consider a variety of factors, including:

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Hinsdale divorce over 50 attorney

Many groups in the United States have experienced a drop in divorce rates; however, the opposite is true for older Americans. According to the National Center for Health Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people divorcing after the age of 50 (known as gray divorce) has just about doubled since 1990. Gray divorce has become increasingly more common for a few different reasons. For example, divorce has lost much of the stigma it carried years ago, and people are living longer and not willing to stay in unfulfilling marriages.

Gray divorces often include a variety of unique financial considerations and legal issues that may not have the same importance for other divorcing couples. Some people may worry that they will not have enough money to retire when they originally planned to. Other people may be concerned with what happens to the assets that they have accumulated throughout their years of marriage. Understanding these issues and how to deal with them is the key to a successful gray divorce.

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DuPage County parent child relocation lawyer

It is rather common for people to move after they divorce. Sometimes, they move due to a new job or promotion, other times they move to be closer to family. Whatever the reason, there are certain rules parents must follow when they wish to relocate with their child. Any parent who has been allocated the majority of or equal parenting time can seek to relocate with his or her child, but there are certain procedures that must be followed.

Factors for Relocation

The parent seeking to relocate must provide written notice at least 60 days before the relocation. If the child’s other parent agrees to the relocation, signs the notice, and files it with the clerk of the circuit court, then the relocation will be allowed.

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Posted on in Divorce

Elmhurst divorce attorneyWhile issues regarding children—including child custody, visitation, and child support—take precedence during the divorce process, financial matters also rank high on the list of importance. Among the primary concerns for many individuals is how much their divorce will cost. While the cost of divorce varies according to region and the services provided, we can assess the average divorce cost in the United States.

How Much Is Divorce?

The U.S. average cost for a divorce is approximately $15,000 per divorcing spouse. This includes all applicable lawyer fees, court costs, and the hiring of any necessary outside advisors, including real estate appraisers, child custody evaluators, and tax professionals. Your amount, however, could be substantially lower, based on a number of factors.

What Drives the Price of a Divorce?

Time plays a significant role in how much a divorce costs. While the average divorce takes between four and 11 months to complete, those that result in courtroom litigation can go more than a year, sometimes two. The more hours an attorney must put into your case, the more it will cost.

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