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Wakenight & Associates, P.C.

1100 Lake Street, Suite 120, Oak Park, IL 60301

DuPage County | 630-852-9700

Mokena | 815-727-6144   Oak Park | 708-848-3159

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Recent blog posts

Oak Brook child support attorney

Everyone knows that raising children can be expensive; the costs of food, clothing, toys, and a variety of other expenses can add up quickly. In fact, it is now estimated that the average cost of raising and supporting a child to age 18 is around $233,610, according to a 2017 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) study. While this may not seem like a lot when it is stretched out over 18 years, it can be difficult for one parent to pay for all of the costs of raising a child. This is why child support is typically ordered in cases in which parents are divorced or separated, ensuring that both parents are responsible for financially providing for a child’s needs.

Extra Costs of Raising a Child

In Illinois, a basic child support obligation is typically determined during a divorce case, and this is meant to account for all of the child’s basic needs, such as food, clothing, and housing. However, any parent knows that there are many more expenses involved in raising a child. That is why Illinois law also has provisions to account for other child-related expenses, such as:

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Hinsdale family law attorney joint simplified dissolution

The most common type of divorce in Illinois is the typical, formal dissolution of marriage. This can be completed in various ways, including through the use of mediation, collaborative law, or litigation. All of these procedures can be used to reach the same end result, though how a couple gets there can vary wildly from case to case. In some cases, divorce can take months or even years, and spouses may wish to avoid a long, drawn-out process and do everything they can to complete the process quickly and effectively. One option that is available to a select group of married individuals in Illinois is called the Joint Simplified Dissolution. A simplified dissolution allows couples to keep costs down and spend much less time finalizing the divorce. However, this option is not available to everyone.

Important Considerations Before You Start

Before you can decide to get a joint simplified dissolution, you must first understand that it only applies to specific types of cases. There are limits on how long you were married, how much property you own, and you and your spouse’s income. Additionally, there are a few key things to keep in mind if you are considering a joint simplified dissolution:

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Oak Brook marital property division attorney

Most of the decisions you make during your divorce can and probably will affect you for the rest of your life, but one of the most important decisions you and your spouse must come to is how you will divide your marital estate. For many couples, this can be an emotional and highly contentious process because of the importance placed on their belongings and the need to have financial security after the divorce process has been completed. The way marital property is divided can affect a person’s financial stability or even their ability to retire later in life. With so much at stake, Illinois courts urge couples to try to come to an agreement on their own about property division, though, if they cannot, they will have to take the issue to court.

Factors for Consideration

If a couple is unable to reach an agreement about how their marital estate will be divided, they will have to appear before a judge so that he or she can make a determination for them. If this happens, the judge will only make decisions about marital property, or any property that was acquired after the couple was legally married but before a judgment of legal separation was entered. The judge will consider a variety of factors, including:

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Hinsdale divorce over 50 attorney

Many groups in the United States have experienced a drop in divorce rates; however, the opposite is true for older Americans. According to the National Center for Health Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people divorcing after the age of 50 (known as gray divorce) has just about doubled since 1990. Gray divorce has become increasingly more common for a few different reasons. For example, divorce has lost much of the stigma it carried years ago, and people are living longer and not willing to stay in unfulfilling marriages.

Gray divorces often include a variety of unique financial considerations and legal issues that may not have the same importance for other divorcing couples. Some people may worry that they will not have enough money to retire when they originally planned to. Other people may be concerned with what happens to the assets that they have accumulated throughout their years of marriage. Understanding these issues and how to deal with them is the key to a successful gray divorce.

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Elmhurst paternity attorney

When a child is born to parents who are not married or who have never been married to one another, this can pose a few problems. In the state of Illinois, a man is only presumed to be the father of a child if he and the mother were married when the child was born, or if they were married within a 300-day period before the child’s birth. If neither of those situations is true, then the parents must go about other ways to establish the paternity of the child. In many cases, before a court will enter an Order of Paternity, they will require that the mother, the alleged father, and the child submit to genetic testing to determine the true biological father of the child.

Genetic Testing Procedure

The organization conducting the genetic testing will be chosen by the court, but a petitioner is also permitted to conduct independent genetic testing if they so choose. A child gets half of their genes from their mother and half of their genes from their father. DNA testing works by comparing the genes of the child with the genes from both parents. The Illinois Paternity Act states that DNA samples can be from blood, bone, hair, or other bodily fluids, though the most common way to gather DNA samples is from a simple swab of the cheek.

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